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Vacancy Announcement: Chief, Epidemiology Branch, NHLBI

January 25, 2018

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) is recruiting for an outstanding individual to serve as Chief of the Epidemiology Branch in the Prevention and Population Sciences Program (PPSP) of the Division of Cardiovascular Sciences (DCVS).  This Supervisory GS-15 level position will be included in the upcoming NIH global recruitment for Health Scientist Administrators, which will be open January 29 through February 7, 2018.

The Epidemiology Branch in DCVS supports, designs, and conducts research and supports training in cardiovascular epidemiology, as well provides expertise in other disease areas in NHLBI’s purview, including lung, blood, and sleep disorders.  Studies are conducted to identify temporal trends and population patterns in the prevalence, incidence, morbidity, and mortality from these diseases and include single- and multi-center observational epidemiology studies of the development, progression, and treatment of cardiovascular diseases, as well as lung, blood, and sleep diseases and disorders. Studies identify environmental, lifestyle, physiological, and genetic risk factors for disease and risk factor development, including characterization of gene/gene and gene/environment interactions.  The Branch also distributes data from all eligible NHLBI studies to researchers as a national data resource, adhering to guidelines that protect participant privacy and confidentiality.

The Branch Chief requires the experience and expertise to provide research leadership in cardiovascular epidemiology, and the necessary management skills to lead the scientific and administrative staff in the Branch.  For additional information about the Epidemiology Branch and PPSP, please visit our website.

NHLBI Announces Plan to Fund a Limited Framingham Heart Study Exam

January 12, 2018

As previously reported on this Digital Forum, an NHLBI working group comprised of selected members of the NHLBI Advisory Council and Board of External Experts presented a set of seven recommendations for transforming population research to the NHLBI Council in 2014.  The recommendations were subsequently published in 2015 (Roger VL et al. Strategic Transformation of Population Studies: Recommendations of the Working Group on Epidemiology and Population Sciences From the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Advisory Council and Board of External Experts. Am J. Epidemiol 2015;181(6):363-367).  In its Recommendation 7, the working group advised the NHLBI to “implement a competitive peer review–based model for its portfolio of large epidemiologic and population studies,” in which funding decisions for study infrastructure are separated from peer review for innovative research content.

Consistent with that Recommendation 7, the NHLBI recently announced its intent to fund a limited clinic exam cycle in the Framingham Heart Study (FHS).  (See NIH Guide Notice NOT-HL-17-572.)  The exam, which will take place beginning on or about August 1, 2019, will serve as a platform for investigator-initiated, peer-reviewed, independently funded exam components that will enrich the exam data collection with additional hypothesis-driven content.  The intent of NOT-HL-17-572 is to allow time for interested researchers to comply with FHS requirements and develop NIH grant applications to fund exam components addressing innovative research questions in FHS.

The Table summarizes timing considerations for submitting grant applications proposing exam components for the FHS clinic exam cycle.  (See this website for more information about NIH grant application cycles, due dates, etc.)

Potential applicants may wish to consider the following:

  • Receipt of new (A0) applications by the October 2018 Council Cycle (Cycle I) standard receipt dates would allow time for review and potential funding before the exam cycle begins.  Receipt of resubmission (A1) applications for the following May 2019 Council Cycle (Cycle III) would allow time for review before the exam cycle begins; funding would occur approximately one month prior to the anticipated exam start date.
  • Receipt of new (A0) applications received by the January 2019 Council Cycle (Cycle II) standard receipt dates would allow time for review and potential funding before the exam cycle begins.  Receipt of resubmission (A1) applications for the following October 2019 Council (Cycle 1) would occur after the proposed exam start date.

Applicants will need to consider timing of their data collection relative to that of the planned exam and any additional time and associated costs that may be required to complete their exam components as proposed.

If you are interested in partnering with FHS in developing and obtaining funding for innovative content for the upcoming exam, please carefully read NOT-HL-17-572 and visit the FHS website for its ancillary studies policies and other relevant information.

NHLBI Announces Plan to Fund a Limited Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Exam 3

November 28, 2017

In recent posts on this Digital Forum, NHLBI announced plans to fund a new examination in the CARDIA Study and the Jackson Heart Study.  NHLBI would now like to announce its intent to fund a new limited clinic Visit 3 in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL; see NIH Guide Notice NOT-HL-17-563).  The exam, which will take place from approximately November 1, 2019 through October 31, 2022, will serve as a platform for investigator-initiated, peer-reviewed, independently funded exam components that will enrich the exam data collection with additional hypothesis-driven content.  The intent of Notice NOT-HL-17-563 is to allow ample time for interested researchers to comply with HCHS/SOL requirements and develop NIH grant applications to fund exam components addressing innovative research questions in HCHS/SOL.

The Table summarizes timing considerations for submitting grant applications proposing components for HCHS/SOL’s Exam 3 cycle.  (See this website for more information about NIH grant application cycles, due dates, etc.)

Potential applicants may wish to consider the following:

  • New (A0) applications and resubmission (A1) applications received by the May 2019 Council Cycle (Cycle III) standard due dates and that receive fundable scores would enable an award approximately 4 months before the HCHS/SOL Exam 3.
  • While new (A0) applications received by the January 2019 Council Cycle (Cycle II) standard due dates would, if funded, have ample time to prepare for the Visit 3 data collection, resubmission (A1) applications received by the October 2019 Council Cycle (Cycle I) standard due dates that receive fundable scores would result in grant awards 1 month after the planned Visit 3 start.
  • For new (A0) applications received by the May 2019 Council Cycle (Cycle III) standard receipt dates that do not receive fundable scores, amended (A1) applications will not be funded until 5 months after Visit 3 is underway.

Therefore, for grant applications received after the January 2019 Council Cycle (Cycle II) standard due dates (due dates between May 25 and September 7, 2018), applicants will need to consider timing of their data collection relative to that of the planned exam and any additional time and associated costs that may be required to complete their exam components as proposed.

If you are interested in partnering with the HCHS/SOL in developing and obtaining funding for innovative content for the upcoming exam, please carefully read the NIH Guide Notice NOT-HL-17-563 and visit the HCHS/SOL website for its ancillary studies policies and other relevant information.

Announcing a New Cohort Exam in The Jackson Heart Study

October 18, 2017

In a recent post on this Digital Forum, NHLBI announced a plan to fund a new examination in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study.  NHLBI would now like to announce its intent to fund a new clinical Exam 4 in the Jackson Heart Study (JHS; see NIH Guide Notice NOT-HL-17-542).  Exam 4, which will take place from approximately February 16, 2020 through November 15, 2022, will serve as a platform for additional exam components via investigator-initiated, peer reviewed, independently funded projects to enrich the exam data collection with additional hypothesis-driven content.  The research aims of such exam-related ancillary projects need not be limited to those within the mission of the NHLBI, but must be consistent with and/or complement the JHS’s objectives.  The intent of Notice NOT-HL-17-542 is to allow ample time for interested researchers to comply with JHS requirements and develop NIH grant applications to fund exam components addressing innovative research questions in the JHS.

The Table summarizes timing considerations for submitting grant applications proposing components for the JHS Exam 4.  (See this website for more information about NIH grant application cycles, due dates, etc.)

Potential applicants may wish to consider the following:

  • Receipt of new (A0) applications by the October 2018 Council (Cycle I) and January 2019 Council (Cycle II) standard due dates that receive fundable scores may be awarded with approximately 14 and 10 months, respectively, for planning and preparation before the JHS Exam 4 data collection begins.
  • Receipt of new (A0) applications by the May 2019 Council (Cycle III) standard receipt dates that receive fundable scores may be funded approximately 7 months before the JHS Exam 4 begins. It will have to be determined whether this will be enough time to begin data collection prior to the start of Exam 4.  If not, a start date during the first year of Exam 4 may be possible.
  • For the receipt of new (A0) applications by the October 2018 Council (Cycle I) standard due dates that do not receive fundable scores:
    • Receipt of resubmission (A1) applications by the May 2019 Council (Cycle III) standard due dates receiving fundable scores may be awarded approximately 7 months before the JHS Exam 4 begins.  As noted above, it will have to be determined whether this will be enough time to begin data collection prior to the start of Exam 4.  If not, a start date during the first year of Exam 4 may be possible.
  • Receipt of new (A0) applications by the January 2019 Council (Cycle II) standard due dates that do not receive fundable scores would allow:
    • Receipt of resubmission (A1) applications by the October 2019 Council (Cycle I) standard due dates to enable a funded award approximately 2 months before the JHS Exam 4 begins.  This will not allow adequate time for planning and preparation before Exam 4 begins, but a start date during the first year of the exam may be possible.
  • Receipt of new (A0) applications by the May 2019 Council (Cycle III) standard receipt dates that do not receive fundable scores, receipt of resubmission (A1) applications, will not allow funding until after Exam 4 is underway.

Therefore, for grant applications received after the January 2019 Council (Cycle II) standard due dates (due dates between May 25 and September 7, 2018), applicants will need to consider timing of their data collection relative to that of the planned exam and any additional time and associated costs that may be required to complete their exam components as proposed.

If you are interested in partnering with the JHS in developing and obtaining funding for innovative content for the upcoming exam, please carefully read the NIH Guide Notice (NOT-HL-17-542) and visit the JHS website for its ancillary studies policies and other relevant information.

NHLBI Announces Plan to Fund a Limited CARDIA Year 35 Exam

September 20, 2017

As previously reported on this Digital Forum (https://nhlbiepi.wordpress.com/2014/10/22/recommendations-from-the-nhlbi-working-group-on-epidemiology/), an NHLBI working group comprised of selected members of the NHLBI Advisory Council and Board of External Experts presented a set of seven recommendations for transforming population research to the NHLBI Council in 2014.  The recommendations were subsequently published in 2015 (Roger VL et al. Strategic Transformation of Population Studies: Recommendations of the Working Group on Epidemiology and Population Sciences From the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Advisory Council and Board of External Experts. Am J. Epidemiol 2015;181(6):363-367).  In its Recommendation 7, the working group advised the NHLBI to “implement a competitive peer review–based model for its portfolio of large epidemiologic and population studies,” in which funding decisions for study infrastructure are separated from peer review for innovative research content.

Consistent with that Recommendation 7, the NHLBI recently announced its intent to fund a limited Year 35 clinic exam cycle in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study.  (See NIH Guide Notice NOT-HL-17-536; https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-HL-17-536.html).  The exam, which will take place from approximately June 1, 2020 through July 31, 2021, will serve as a platform for investigator-initiated, peer-reviewed, independently funded exam components that will enrich the exam data collection with additional hypothesis-driven content. The intent of Notice NOT-HL-17-536; https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-HL-17-536.html is to allow ample time for interested researchers to comply with CARDIA requirements and develop NIH grant applications to fund exam components addressing innovative research questions in CARDIA.

Table 1 summarizes timing considerations for submitting grant applications proposing exam components for CARDIA’s Year 35 clinic exam cycle.  (See https://grants.nih.gov/grants/how-to-apply-application-guide/due-dates-and-submission-policies/due-dates.htm for more information about NIH grant application cycles, due dates, etc.)

Potential applicants may wish to consider the following:

  • Resubmission (A1) applications received by the October 2019 Council Cycle (Cycle I) standard due dates would enable an award approximately 6 months before the CARDIA Year 35 clinic exam cycle begins.
  • Receipt of new (A0) applications by the May 2019 Council Cycle (Cycle III) standard receipt dates would allow time for review and potential funding before the Year 35 exam cycle begins but receipt, review, and potential funding of resubmission (A1) applications for the following January 2020 Council Cycle (Cycle II) may not allow adequate preparation time before the exam begins.
  • New (A0) applications received by the October 2019 Council Cycle (Cycle I) standard receipt dates would allow time for review and potential funding but would not allow adequate time for submission, review, and funding of a resubmission (A1) application until after the Year 35 exam is underway.

Therefore, for grant applications received after the October 2019 Council Cycle (Cycle II) standard due dates (due dates between January 25 and May 7, 2019), applicants will need to consider timing of their data collection relative to that of the planned exam and any additional time and associated costs that may be required to complete their exam components as proposed.

If you are interested in partnering with CARDIA in developing and obtaining funding for innovative content for the upcoming exam, please carefully read the NIH Guide Notice (NOT-HL-17-536; https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-HL-17-536.html) and visit the CARDIA website (https://www.cardia.dopm.uab.edu/) for its ancillary studies policies and other relevant information.

Epidemiology – HLBS (Heart, Lung, Blood, Sleep), Cancer, and Beyond

August 11, 2015

InNCI-NHLBI Blog Graphic the recent years, the NHLBI and NCI have launched separate discussions about the future of epidemiology. As noted in our previous blog posts, the NHLBI convened a working group that generated its recommendations on the strategic transformation of epidemiology (see published report). The NCI’s own recommendations and proposed actions are outlined in its article, “Transforming Epidemiology for 21st Century Medicine and Public Health.” These recommendations have the potential to benefit the field of epidemiology as a whole, beyond HLBS (heart, lung, blood, and sleep) diseases and cancer.

To facilitate further discussion, we list side by side the recommendations for action that emerged from the NCI and NHLBI processes and group them into 7 common thematic areas: leadership, resources, cohorts, methods, workforce, integration and evaluation (Table 1).

We welcome your input on comments and suggestions for actions to further the implementation of the NCI and NHLBI recommendations, to leverage existing epidemiology resources, and build future ones that enable coverage across multiple diseases. The NCI has concurrently posted this topic on their blog to solicit comments from their epidemiology community as well.

Your Voice Matters

March 30, 2015

announcerThe NHLBI has launched its Strategic Visioning Website to obtain input from all corners of the NHLBI community, including you – the epidemiology researcher. You are asked to identify the most compelling questions and critical challenges to the NHLBI in the coming years. Submissions for this round are due no later than May 15, 2015.

A major recommendation from the NHLBI Working Group on epidemiology stated that the NHLBI should “convene a scientific forum to determine the major scientific questions and methodological needs in epidemiology and population science over the next 10-20 years” (see newly published report and previous NHLBI blog post).  The Strategic Visioning Website allows you to contribute to that forum.

So go ahead and:
• Crystalize your thoughts on the future scientific questions and methods
• Go to the  Strategic Visioning Website
• Submit questions and challenges
• Read and comment on others’ submissions

Contribute to know that your voice from the epidemiology community is heard.